North Carolina

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Planning the Future of Your Farm: A Workbook on Farm Succession

This workbook is an update of earlier editions published throughout the Southeast between 2006 and 2013 for the families that own (and produce or receive income from) farm, forest and horticultural land in North Carolina. It is specifically for those who want to keep their farmland in production and/or in the family as it passes to the next generation, and are willing to commit the work necessary to achieve that goal. 

North Carolina Farm Link

NC Farm Link was co-developed by Center for Environmental Farming Systems, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Inter-Faith Food Shuttle, and WNC FarmLink. It is collaboratively managed and supported by a network of partners across the state.  NC Farm Link assists a multitude of individuals at differing stages of their careers to find property that will suit their needs and goals.  

Growing Local Food Systems: A Case Study Series on the Role of Local Governments

This report features four case studies highlighting various forms of local government support for food systems in Catawba County, NC; Decatur, GA; Topsham, ME and Washtenaw County-Ann Arbor, MI. Lessons learned may be helpful to those interested in working within or with their local governments on marketing, coordination, policy and funding for food system activities.

Planning for Agriculture and Food Systems - Communities That Are Leading the Way: Growing Food Connections

The presentations in this session from American Farmland Trust's Farmland, Food and Livable Communities Conference discuss how local governments can play an important public policy role to support farmers, food production and food security for all community residents. The presentations explore results from recent research on how local governments are developing and implementing a wide range of innovative programs, regulations, laws, financial investment, and other policies to address agricultural viability and community food security.

Farm Succession Planning

Farm succession planning – the process where management, income and ownership of a farm operation’s assets are transferred to a succeeding operator – is an issue faced by all families involved in a successful farm operation. Where a senior owner/operator wishes that a farm operation continue beyond their retirement, sustained planning must be undertaken to avoid numerous risks that can reduce the chances that an operation will succeed under new management.

An Agricultural Development and Farmland Protection Plan for Buncombe County

The Buncombe County Farmland Protection Plan reflects a vision of interdependent urban and rural landscapes, which both enjoy and profit from the natural beauty and fertility of the land itself. The plan looks to sustaining an increasingly diverse, educated, and cosmopolitan community though a dynamic mix of enterprises of which a major proportion will be, directly or indirectly, land-based. These include not only agriculture in the narrow sense of producing crops, livestock, and timber, but also all enterprises that benefit from clean air and water and appealing rural scenery. 

The Cost of Community Services in Henderson County

One important element of public debate over appropriate land use policies is whether or not increased county government expenditures on community services needed to accommodate residential and commercial development exceed the contribution of that development to the county’s revenue stream. This report presents the findings of a research project aimed at addressing this specific issue.

The Cost of Community Services in Guilford County

One important element of public debate over appropriate land use policies is whether or not increased county government expenditures on community services needed to accommodate residential and commercial development exceed the contribution of that development to the county’s revenue stream. This report presents the findings of a research project aimed at addressing this specific issue.

The Cost of Community Services in Gaston County

One important element of public debate over appropriate land use policies is whether or not increased county government expenditures on community services needed to accommodate residential and commercial development exceed the contribution of that development to the county’s revenue stream. This report presents the findings of a research project aimed at addressing this specific issue.

The Cost of Community Services in Franklin County

One important element of public debate over appropriate land use policies is whether or not increased county government expenditures on community services needed to accommodate residential and commercial development exceed the contribution of that development to the county’s revenue stream. This report presents the findings of a research project aimed at addressing this specific issue.

The Cost of Community Services in Durham County

One important element of public debate over appropriate land use policies is whether or not increased county government expenditures on the community services needed to accommodate residential and commercial development exceed the contribution of that development to the county’s revenue stream. This report presents the findings of a research project aimed at addressing this specific issue.

The Cost of Community Services in Alamance County

The analysis presented here employs a methodology established by the American Farmland Trust, one that has been used in numerous Cost of Community Services (COCS) studies throughout the U.S. Like those studies, the current research was motivated by two questions: (1) Do the property taxes and other revenues generated by residential land uses exceed the amount of publicly-provided services supplied to them?

From Farm to Fork: A Guide to Building North Carolina’s Sustainable Local Food Economy

This guide is the product of a yearlong “Farm to Fork” initiative, involving well over 1,000 North Carolinians interested in becoming actively engaged in food and farming issues. Participants in this process included people and organizations working in the fields of agriculture, commercial fishing, community organizing, education, faith, finance, local government, nutrition, philanthropy, planning, public health, public policy and youth outreach.

Regional Food Systems Infrastructure

In recent years, an emphasis on eating locally grown food has flourished. Amid concerns about the energy required to transport food around the globe, the environmental impacts of large-scale industrial farming operations, and food safety issues, many Americans have sought to direct more of their food-purchasing budget to producers located closer to home. Farmers markets, community-supported agriculture (CSA) programs, and efforts to strengthen connections between regional producers and consumers have grown exponentially to meet this demand; indeed, the number of farmers markets in the U.S.

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