Nebraska

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Douglas County, NE: Commercial Incubator Kitchen Application and Agreement

The Commercial Incubator Kitchen at the Douglas County Fairgrounds was designed in 2005 as part of the renovated shared commercial kitchen project to provide space for farmers and food entrepreneurs to add value to their products, extend their product line and season, and build their small business in a safe, certified environment.

100 Acre Farm Advantage Program

The University of Nebraska College of Technical Agriculture's (NCTA) 100 Acre Farm Advantage program provides an educational curriculum and forum whereby students, parents, employers, and agencies come together to create business plans and transfer programs that will lead to young farmers returning to rural communities as owner-operators.

Nebraska Investment Finance Authority Beginning Farmer/Rancher Program

The Nebraska Investment Finance Authority (NIFA) Beginning Farmer/Rancher Program enables farmers or ranchers to obtain loans at interest rates lower than those generally available in the conventional farm credit markets. This is made possible by the issuance of a tax-exempt bond by NIFA, purchased by the farmer/rancher's lender, providing the lender with interest that is exempt from federal and Nebraska state income tax. The lender then sets the rate of interest on the farm loan to reflect the tax-exempt rate on the bond.

Nebraska Beginning Farmer Tax Credit Program

Under the Nebraska Beginning Farmer Tax Credit Program beginning farmers receive a three-year lease to get started in farming or ranching and a maximum $500 tax credit reimbursement for the required Financial Management Class. Agricultural asset owners (landowners) receive a refundable tax credit equal to 10 percent of the cash rent or 15 percent of the value of the share crop rent received each year for three years.

Nebraska Connections

The Nebraska Department of Agriculture’s Beginning Farmer Program offers Nebraska Connections, an online listing of agricultural assets sought by beginning farmers and ranchers and available from agricultural operators and landowners. The listing includes land, equipment and other agricultural amenities needed by a farmer or rancher getting started in the industry.

Nebraska: Beginning Farmer Program Application (Asset Owner)

The Nebraska Beginning Farmer Programs are designed to help new producers get a head start in farming and ranching, while giving back to the farmers and ranchers who own agricultural assets and are still interested in being involved in the farming or ranching process.  This document is the application for agricultural asset owners interested in participating in the program.

Ecolabel Value Assessment: Consumer and Food Business Perceptions of Local Foods

An ecolabel is a seal or a logo indicating that a product has met a certain set of environmental and/or social standards or attributes. Ecolabels offer one avenue to educate consumers about locally grown, sustainably-raised foods.

The Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture partnered in a pilot with the Iowa State University Business Analysis Laboratory to conduct consumer and food business market research related to ecolabels.

Ecolabel Value Assessment Phase II: Consumer Perceptions of Local Foods

An ecolabel is a seal or logo indicating that a product has met a certain set of environmental and/or social standards or attributes. Ecolabels offer one important avenue to educate consumers about locally grown, sustainably raised foods.

The Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture partnered with the Iowa State University Business Analysis Laboratory in the second phase of a pilot project to conduct consumer market research on food ecolabels and perceptions of locally grown foods. The specific objectives for Phase II were as follows:

Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) in the Midwest United States: A Regional Characterization

For the past 20 years, we have heard a great deal about Community Supported Agriculture as a novel marketing and community-building concept. The accepted history of Community Supported Agriculture in the United States is that Jan VanderTuin brought the concept from Switzerland in 1984. CSA projects had been sprouting up there and in other parts of Europe since the 1960s. Such enterprises also were found in Japan in the 1960s when women’s neighborhood groups began approaching farmers to develop direct, cooperative relationships between producers and consumers, known as ‘teikei.’

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