Indiana

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The Land Connection

The Land Connection trains farmers in resilient, restorative farming techniques; informs the public about the sources of our food and why that matters; and works to protect and enhance farmland so that we, and generations to come, will have clean air and water, fertile soil, and healthy, delicious food.

The Land Connection’s classified section is a place to help find a farmer for your land, or find farmland to launch your farm business. This section can also help you find a mentor or intern. 

Land Link-Up

The Midwest Organic and Sustainable Education Service offers Land Link-Up, an online list where those seeking land to farm and farmland owners can post descriptions of farmland sought and of farmland for rent/sale along with contact information.

A Guide for Local Land Use Planning for Agricultural Operations

The Indiana State Department of Agriculture and Indiana Land Resources Council believe the model agricultural zoning ordinances in this guide are valuable to counties across the state as they make proactive decisions about land use. There are many different strategies to accommodate the land use needs of a community, and the best approach for each county is to tailor solutions to its unique characteristics. These models are intended to address land use issues that arise because of the variety of residential and agricultural uses found in rural Indiana today.

A Cost of Community Services Study For Indiana Counties and School Corporations

This study looks at two alternate assumptions about property values. Some costs are allocated based on property values. In Indiana’s assessment system, all property except farmland is assessed at market value. Farmland is assessed at its use value in agriculture, which appears to be less than one-third its market value, on average. If costs are allocated with use value, the agricultural COCS ratios tend to be less than one. If costs are allocated with estimated market value, the ratios tend to be greater than one. It is not clear which assumption is more appropriate.

The Regional Economic Development Potential and Constraints in Local Foods Development in the Midwest

There are no standard definitions of what constitutes "local" food amidst a burgeoning local food promotion and policy-development movement. Nonetheless, government policies are rapidly evolving to promote local food production. For most states, anything produced or processed in-state is considered local. In other instances, a 250 or even a 500 mile perimeter constitutes an acceptable boundary justifying a local food territory for policy making purposes or purchasing preferences.

Smart Growth Policies: An Evaluation of Programs and Outcomes

Despite the widespread adoption of smart growth principles, there has been little systematic assessment of their effectiveness or consequences. To fill this need, the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy collaborated with 14 of the country’s leading public policy researchers and planners to measure performance in four states with statewide smart growth programs (Florida, Maryland, New Jersey, and Oregon) and performance in four states without such programs (Colorado, Indiana, Texas, and Virginia).

Ecolabel Value Assessment: Consumer and Food Business Perceptions of Local Foods

An ecolabel is a seal or a logo indicating that a product has met a certain set of environmental and/or social standards or attributes. Ecolabels offer one avenue to educate consumers about locally grown, sustainably-raised foods.

The Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture partnered in a pilot with the Iowa State University Business Analysis Laboratory to conduct consumer and food business market research related to ecolabels.

Ecolabel Value Assessment Phase II: Consumer Perceptions of Local Foods

An ecolabel is a seal or logo indicating that a product has met a certain set of environmental and/or social standards or attributes. Ecolabels offer one important avenue to educate consumers about locally grown, sustainably raised foods.

The Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture partnered with the Iowa State University Business Analysis Laboratory in the second phase of a pilot project to conduct consumer market research on food ecolabels and perceptions of locally grown foods. The specific objectives for Phase II were as follows:

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